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the hearing resumed, brennan defended u.s. actions in the war on terror, but he acknowledged the c.i.a. is not immune from scrutiny. >> i have publicly acknowledged that our fight against al queda and associated forces has sometimes involved the use of lethal force outside the hot battle field of afghanistan. accordingly it is understandable there is great interest in the legal basis as well as the thresholds, criteria, processes, procedures, approvals and review for such actions. i have strongly promoted such public discussion with the congress, and with the american people as i believe our system of government and our commitment to transparency demand nothing less. >> reporter: late wednesday, mr. obama directed that the house and senate intelligence committees be given a classified memo on drone strikes abroad. it lays out the legal rationale for targeting american terrorism suspects. brennan has helped manage the program. oregon democrat ron wyden had pressed for release of the memo. he went directly to the issue during his first pass at questioning brennan. >> what should be d
: still to come on the "newshour": china concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal w
community to curb the flow of arms into syria. another member of the u.s. senate has decided to step aside. republican mike johanns of nebraska announced today he will not seek a second term next year. in a statement, he said he wants to spend more time with his family, after spending 32 of his 62 years in various offices. johanns is the fifth senator to announce plans to retire next year. a hall of fame figure in pro basketball, former los angeles lakers owner jerry buss, died today. he'd battled cancer for months. buss ran the lakers for nearly 34 years, and they won ten n.b.a. championships during that time. along the way, he brought in star players from kareem abdul- jabbar to magic johnson to kobe bryant. he was also one of the first owners to create his own cable tv network, and sell the naming rights to his arena. jerry buss was 80 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to this weekend's protests and the big debate over the extension of an oil pipeline from canada into the u.s. as the u.s. tries to navigate between clean ene
there is a safety problem. the eating of horse meat is quite a taboo. a member of the u.s. commerce community faces a long prison sentence for his role in a series of attacks in which victims hair and beards were forcibly cut off -- a member of the u.s. amish community. he and 15 members of his breakaway group were found guilty of five hate crimes in the american state of ohio. heavy snowfall started in the northeast of the united states. it is the beginning of what is predicted to be a massive, even historic, a blizzard. people have been stocking up on food and other supplies ahead of the storm, which is poised to dump up to a meter of snow from new york city to boston and beyond. the parents of a teenage girl shot dead days after appearing at president obama's inauguration have told the bbc that american gun laws have to change. 15-year-old hadiya pendleton was killed in a park on chicago's south side in what police believe was a case of mistaken identity. michelle obama will attend her funeral tomorrow. despite the soul-searching in america following the sandy hook shooting, january was the dead
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown every four months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense pro
to california, texas and florida. currently, just over half of the u.s. is affected by some form of drought, but that's down from last year. the u.s. chamber of commerce and the a.f.l.-c.i.o. have agreed on principles for a key part of immigration reform: letting in more lower-skilled workers. the two groups called today for a new worker visa program that makes it easier to hire foreign workers when americans are not available to fill jobs. the principles also envision a federal bureau to track labor market needs and shortages. the focus of the gun control debate shifted back to connecticut today. vice president biden attended a conference in danbury, just miles from sandy hook elementary school, where 26 people were killed last december. biden urged support for the administration's proposals to curb gun violence and he warned there is a moral price to pay for inaction. >> the president is absolutely determined, that the loudest voices will be for the voices of the people who lost their voice. they will be the loudest voices in this debate. we intend to speak for them; enough is enough. we
-- including the rise of china, other emergent centers of power, the roll of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans, and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one to the other and what choices they pose to us. how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future, and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> in order to take advantage of all these forces, though, you also suggest that democracy in part has been hijacked, that washington has become dysfunctional. >> yeah. >> and that threatens our ability to use all the tools. >> absolutely. we have two macro tools to use in shaping our future, roughly speaking. democracy and capitalism. in the world of political systems the alternatives to democracy have been tested and found wanting, no need to go into the details. the same is true in economic theory, all the alternatives to capitalism. capitalism efficiently allocates resource, balances supply an demand, conducive to higher levels of freedom and unlocks a higher fraction
. there are 1.5 million registered 501(c)3 charities in the u.s., but finding those that have the biggest impact in the communities they serve isn't easy. large charitable foundations, much like institutional investors, do their own research, but its more challenging for individual donors. the global philanthropy network started the social impact exchange, a group made up of non-profit organizations and non-profit experts. they came up with something similar to a stock index called the s&i index, for "social" and "impact." only, instead of publicly traded stocks, it's made up of the top charities in the country with a proven track record. the doe fund is one of those. >> if we couldn't measure it, it wasn't worth doing for us. >> reporter: at s&, donors can search organizations in their communities, review growth plans and program metrics. >> if you really want to have confidence that you're going to help a child learn to read or move a single mom out of poverty or graduate kids from the toughest neighborhoods of high school, these are the organizations that have proof that they're doing
's nothing on earth more mobile than capital and capital income. and the u.s. is a relatively high capital income tax country. we have about the highest corporate tax on earth. i think guiana and the congo have higher rates. other than that, nobody does. so if we try to drive up the amount of revenue we extract from capital the capital flees and there are no jobs in the u.s. so we have to have a more 21st century appreciation for how economies really work. and if we want to create high-paying jobs for people we need to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in decades. >> because they're locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, t
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)